Is Your Coach A Professional

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This article might ruffle a few feathers, and it should. There are many generalizations and assumptions. There will always be rules to the exemption. The point of this article is to make you think.

At fitness professionals are becoming more in demand we are seeing more and more people fill the role. Unfortunately many of these people should not be doing this as their main job.

Does your coach, nutritionist, or whatever designation they have, do this as a full time job? Or is this a hobby or interest they have that they do on the side? Your health and body are probably the most important thing you will ever have. You shouldn’t just entrust it with someone who will not respect it properly. Would you take your car to a mechanic who happens to be a full time lawyer who does car repairs on the side.

Often these professionals do not even realize they are doing a disservice. I have been point coaching for almost 2 decades and I am constantly learning more and feeling like it’s still over my head. Look up what is known as the dunning-Kruger effect.

Basically the Dunning-Kruger effect is the less you know the easier you think something is. As you start to learn more, you realize you knew so little and you still have so much more to learn and to change your old ways of thinking.

Another two issues are professional designation. One, some are meaningless, for example a coach. It could mean anything and does not guarantee anything. The other is assuming that a designation knows more than they do, or that it means they are right. I have met many family doctors trying to give me advice on my training or nutrition, I am pretty sure that is over stepping their education of the one course they took decades ago. People often also assume that just because the person has a designation is that they must be right. I just witnessed a perfect example of this at my internship with Julien Pineau of Strongfit. Watching people with degrees in kinesiology and physical therapy get destroyed by the knowledge Julien demonstrated with no formal education in either realm.

I am not saying if you are coaching part time that you should stop or that it is bad. Maybe you derive satisfaction from this, maybe you plan on doing it full time and want more experience. Either is fine, just try and go in with an open mind that you might know less than you think and always be willing to say you don’t know and refer to someone who might be able to better assist.

Yours in health,
    Coach E

Crossfit Bytown